You are here: Home / Rare Disease Information / Rare Disease Database

Search Rare Diseases

Enter a disease name or synonym to search NORD's database of reports.

0-9 - A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z

Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome

Abstract

You are reading a NORD Rare Disease Report Abstract. NORD’s full collection of reports on over 1200 rare diseases is available to subscribers (click here for details). We are now also offering two full rare disease reports per day to visitors on our Web site.

NORD is very grateful to Dr. Karine Morcel, Obstetric-Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Department, Rennes University Hospital and Dr. Daniel Guerrier, Institute for Genetics and Development of Rennes, France, for assistance in the preparation of this report.

Synonyms of Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome

  • congenital absence of the uterus and vagina (CAUV)
  • genital renal ear syndrome (GRES)
  • MRKH
  • MRKH syndrome
  • Mullerian agenesis
  • Mullerian aplasia
  • Rokitansky syndrome

Disorder Subdivisions

  • isolated Mullerian aplasia
  • Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome type I
  • Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome type II
  • MUllerian duct aplasia-Renal dysplasia-Cervical Somite anomalies Assoc.
  • MURCS association
  • Rokitansky sequence

General Discussion

Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome is a rare disorder that affects women. It is characterized by the failure of the uterus and the vagina to develop properly in women who have normal ovarian function and normal external genitalia. Women with this disorder develop normal secondary sexual characteristics during puberty (e.g., breast development and pubic hair), but do not have a menstrual cycle (primary amenorrhea). Often, the failure to begin the menstrual cycle is the initial clinical sign of MRKH syndrome. The range and severity of MRKH syndrome can vary greatly and the disorder is generally broken down into type I, which occurs as an isolated finding, and type II, which occurs with abnormalities of additional organ systems including mainly the kidneys and the skeleton. Because of the nature of the disorder, MRKH syndrome can cause significant psychological challenges and counseling is recommended. The exact cause of MRKH syndrome remains largely unknown, but there is now no doubt of a genetic origin. In this respect, an update on the most recent research publications shows the involvement of several chromosomal segments, some of them including genes likely to account for the disorder.

Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome Resources

(Please note that some of these organizations may provide information concerning certain conditions potentially associated with this disorder [e.g., kidney abnormalities].)

Organizations:

The information in NORD’s Rare Disease Database is for educational purposes only. It should never be used for diagnostic or treatment purposes. If you have questions regarding a medical condition, always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional. NORD’s reports provide a brief overview of rare diseases. For more specific information, we encourage you to contact your personal physician or the agencies listed as “Resources” on this report.

0-9 - A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z

NORD's Rare Disease Information Database is copyrighted and may not be published without the written consent of NORD.

 
Copyright ©2014 NORD - National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. All rights reserved.
The following trademarks/registered service marks are owned by NORD: NORD, National Organization for Rare Disorders, the NORD logo, RareConnect. .