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Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration

Abstract

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NORD is very grateful to Allison Gregory, MS, CGC, and Susan J Hayflick, MD, Oregon Health & Science University, for assistance in the preparation of this report.

Synonyms of Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration

  • Hallervorden-Spatz Syndrome
  • HARP
  • HSS
  • NBIA1
  • neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation type 1
  • Pigmentary Degeneration of Globus Pallidus, Substantia Nigra, Red Nucleus
  • PKAN

Disorder Subdivisions

  • No subdivisions found.

General Discussion

Summary
Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), formerly called Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome, is a rare, inherited neurological movement disorder characterized by the progressive degeneration of the nervous system (neurodegenerative disorder). PKAN is the most common type of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA), a group of clinical disorders marked by progressive abnormal involuntary movements, alterations in muscle tone, and postural disturbances (extrapyramidal). These disorders show radiographic evidence of iron accumulation in the brain. PKAN is typically diagnosed by the characteristic finding on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) called the “eye-of-the-tiger” sign, which indicates accumulation of iron in the brain in a characteristic pattern.
PKAN is inherited as an autosomal recessive genetic condition and is described as being classical or atypical. Classic PKAN typically appears in early childhood with symptoms that worsen rapidly. Atypical PKAN, which progresses more slowly, appears later in childhood or early adolescence. Some people have been diagnosed in infancy or adulthood and some of those affected have characteristics that are between the two categories.

Introduction
PKAN was first described in 1922 by Drs. Julius Hallervorden and Hugo Spatz with their study of a family of 12 in which five sisters exhibited progressively increasing dementia and poor articulation and slurred speech (dysarthria). The name Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome became discouraged and was replaced with neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation because of concerns regarding Dr. Hallervorden’s and Dr. Spatz’s affiliation with the Nazi regime and their unethical activities surrounding how they obtained many autopsy specimens.

Organizations related to Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration

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