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Beckwith Wiedemann Syndrome

Abstract

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Synonyms of Beckwith Wiedemann Syndrome

  • Beckwith-Syndrome
  • BWS
  • EMG Syndrome
  • Exomphalos-Macroglossia-Gigantism Syndrome
  • Hypoglycemia with Macroglossia
  • Macroglossia-Omphalocele-Visceromegaly Syndrome
  • Omphalocele-Visceromegaly-Macroglossia Syndrome
  • Visceromegaly-Umbilical Hernia-Macroglossia Syndrome
  • Wiedmann-Beckwith Syndrome

Disorder Subdivisions

  • No subdivisions found.

General Discussion

Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a rare genetic overgrowth disorder. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of symptoms and physical findings that vary in range and severity from case to case. However, in many individuals, associated features include above-average birth and weight and increased growth after birth (postnatally), an usually large tongue (macroglossia), enlargement of certain internal organs (visceromegaly), and protrusion of a portion of the intestines and abdominal organs through a tear in the wall of the stomach or bellybutton (abdominal wall defects). BWS may also be associated with low blood sugar levels within the first few days or the first month of life (neonatal hypoglycemia), advanced bone age, particularly up to age four; distinctive grooves in the ear lobes and other facial abnormalities, abnormal enlargement of one side or structure of the body (hemihyperplasia) may occur, resulting in unequal (asymmetric) growth, and an increased risk of developing certain childhood cancers.

In approximately 85 percent of cases, BWS results from genetic changes that appear to occur randomly (sporadically). Approximately 10-15 percent of cases of this syndrome run in families and show autosomal dominant inheritance. Researchers have determined that BWS results from various abnormalities affecting the proper expression or structure of certain genes within a specific region of chromosome 11.

Organizations related to Beckwith Wiedemann Syndrome

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