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Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency

Abstract

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Synonyms of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency

  • G6PD Deficiency

Disorder Subdivisions

  • No subdivisions found.

General Discussion

Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) Deficiency (G6PDD) is an inherited, sex-linked, metabolic disorder characterized by an enzyme defect that leads to the breakdown of red blood cells (hemolysis) upon exposure to stresses associated with some bacterial infections or certain drugs. A deficiency of this enzyme may result in the premature destruction of red blood cells (an acute hemolytic anemia or a chronic spherocytic type) when an affected individual is exposed to certain medications or chemicals, experiences certain viral or bacterial infections, and/or inhales the pollen of, or consumes, fava beans (favism).

Glucose- 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency is inherited as an X-linked genetic trait. It is a common inborn error of metabolism among humans. More than 300 variants of the disorder have been identified, resulting from mutations of the Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase gene. The severity of symptoms associated with G6PD Deficiency may vary greatly among affected individuals, depending upon the specific form of the disorder that is present.

Neonatal G6PDD is particularly dangerous to an infant. It is manageable if caught early, and screening for the disorder is common.

The role of the enzyme G6PD is to maintain the pathway to generate a chemical called glutathione, which in a particular form is an antioxidant. The antioxidant is necessary to protect the cell's hemoglobin and its cell wall (red cell membrane). If the level of antioxidant is too low, then the cell's hemoglobin will not bind oxygen (its main purpose); the cell wall will break allowing the cell contents, including the modified hemoglobin, to spill out.

Organizations related to Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency

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